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Abstract

The fall armyworm (FAW), (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae), is a well-known agricultural pest in its native range, North and South America, and has become a major invasive pest around the globe in the past decade. In this review, we provide an overview to update what is known about in its native geographic ranges. This is followed by discussion of studies from the invaded areas to gain insights into 's ecology, specifically its reproductive biology, host plant use, status of insecticide resistance alleles, and biocontrol methods in native and invasive regions. We show that reference to host strains is uninformative in the invasive populations because multidirectional introduction events likely underpinned its recent rapid spread. Given that recent genomic analyses show that FAW is much more diverse than was previously assumed, and natural selection forces likely differ geographically, region-specific approaches will be needed to control this global pest.

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2023-01-23
2024-06-20
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