1932

Abstract

Animal species present relatively high levels of gene conservation, and yet they display a great variety of cell type and tissue phenotypes. These diverse phenotypes are mainly specified through differential gene usage, which relies on several mechanisms. Two of the most relevant mechanisms are regulated gene transcription, usually referred to as gene expression (rGE), and regulated alternative splicing (rAS). Several works have addressed how either rGE or rAS contributes to phenotypic diversity throughout evolution, but a back-to-back comparison between the two molecular mechanisms, specifically highlighting both their common regulatory principles and unique properties, is still missing. In this review, we propose an innovative framework for the unified comparison between rGE and rAS from different perspectives: the three-dimensional (3D)-evo space. We use the 3D-evo space to comprehensively () review the molecular basis of rGE and rAS (i.e., the molecular axis), () depict the tissue-specific phenotypes they contribute to (i.e., the tissue axis), and () describe the determinants that drive the evolution of rGE and rAS programs (i.e., the evolution axis). Finally, we unify the perspectives emerging from the three axes by discussing general trends and specific examples of rGE and rAS tissue program evolution.

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2022-11-30
2024-06-17
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