1932

Abstract

Perfectly orchestrated periodic gene expression during cell cycle progression is essential for maintaining genome integrity and ensuring that cell proliferation can be stopped by environmental signals. Genetic and proteomic studies during the past two decades revealed remarkable evolutionary conservation of the key mechanisms that control cell cycle–regulated gene expression, including multisubunit DNA-binding DREAM complexes. DREAM complexes containing a retinoblastoma family member, an E2F transcription factor and its dimerization partner, and five proteins related to products of multivulva (Muv) class B genes , , , , and (comprising the MuvB core) have been described in diverse organisms, from worms to humans. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the structure, function, and regulation of DREAM complexes in different organisms, as well as the role of DREAM in human disease.

Keyword(s): B-Mybcancercell cycleE2FFoxM1transcription
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2021-11-23
2024-06-20
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