1932

Abstract

Spermatogenesis is a complex differentiation process coordinated spatiotemporally across and along seminiferous tubules. Cellular heterogeneity has made it challenging to obtain stage-specific molecular profiles of germ and somatic cells using bulk transcriptomic analyses. This has limited our ability to understand regulation of spermatogenesis and to integrate knowledge from model organisms to humans. The recent advancement of single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) technologies provides insights into the cell type diversity and molecular signatures in the testis. Fine-grained cell atlases of the testis contain both known and novel cell types and define the functional states along the germ cell developmental trajectory in many species. These atlases provide a reference system for integrated interspecies comparisons to discover mechanistic parallels and to enable future studies. Despite recent advances, we currently lack high-resolution data to probe germ cell–somatic cell interactions in the tissue environment, but the use of highly multiplexed spatial analysis technologies has begun to resolve this problem. Taken together, recent single-cell studies provide an improvedunderstanding of gametogenesis to examine underlying causes of infertility and enable the development of new therapeutic interventions.

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2022-11-30
2024-06-20
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