1932

Abstract

Bacteria, like eukaryotes, employ cytoskeletal elements to perform many functions, including cell morphogenesis, cell division, DNA partitioning, and cell motility. They not only possess counterparts of eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament proteins, but they also have cytoskeletal elements of their own. Unlike the rigid sequence and structural conservation often observed for eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins, the bacterial counterparts can display considerable diversity in sequence and function across species. Their wide range of function highlights the flexibility of core cytoskeletal protein motifs, such that one type of cytoskeletal element can perform various functions, and one function can be performed by different types of cytoskeletal elements.

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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-genet-102108-134845
2010-12-01
2024-04-23
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  • Article Type: Review Article
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