1932

Abstract

Vertebrate pigment patterns are diverse and fascinating adult traits that allow animals to recognize conspecifics, attract mates, and avoid predators. Pigment patterns in fish are among the most amenable traits for studying the cellular basis of adult form, as the cells that produce diverse patterns are readily visible in the skin during development. The genetic basis of pigment pattern development has been most studied in the zebrafish, . Zebrafish adults have alternating dark and light horizontal stripes, resulting from the precise arrangement of three main classes of pigment cells: black melanophores, yellow xanthophores, and iridescent iridophores. The coordination of adult pigment cell lineage specification and differentiation with specific cellular interactions and morphogenetic behaviors is necessary for stripe development. Besides providing a nice example of pattern formation responsible for an adult trait of zebrafish, stripe-forming mechanisms also provide a conceptual framework for posing testable hypotheses about pattern diversification more broadly. Here, we summarize what is known about lineages and molecular interactions required for pattern formation in zebrafish, we review some of what is known about pattern diversification in , and we speculate on how patterns in more distant teleosts may have evolved to produce a stunningly diverse array of patterns in nature.

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2019-12-03
2024-05-30
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