1932

Abstract

I have been fortunate and privileged to have participated in amazing breakthroughs in human genetics since the 1960s. I was lucky to have trained in medical school at Dartmouth and Johns Hopkins, in pediatrics at the University of Minnesota and Johns Hopkins, and in genetics and molecular biology with Dr. Barton Childs at Johns Hopkins and Dr. Harvey Itano at the National Institutes of Health. Later, the collaborative spirit at Johns Hopkins and the University of Pennsylvania were important to my career. Here, I describe the thrill of scientific discovery in two diverse areas of human genetics: DNA haplotypes and their role in solving the molecular basis of beta thalassemia and the role of retrotransposons (jumping genes) in human biology. I hope that this article may inspire others who love human genetics as much as I do.

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2021-08-31
2024-06-16
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