1932

Abstract

Since the completion of the Human Genome Project, considerable progress has been made in translating knowledge about the genetic basis of disease risk and treatment response into clinical services and public health interventions that have greater precision. It is anticipated that more precision approaches to early detection, prevention, and treatment will be developed and will enhance equity in healthcare and outcomes among disparity populations. Reduced access to genomic medicine research, clinical services, and public health interventions has the potential to exacerbate disparities in genomic medicine. The purpose of this article is to describe these challenges to equity in genomic medicine and identify opportunities and future directions for addressing these issues. Efforts are needed to enhance access to genomic medicine research, clinical services, and public health interventions, and additional research that examines the clinical utility of precision medicine among disparity populations should be prioritized to ensure equity in genomic medicine.

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2022-08-31
2024-06-15
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