1932

Abstract

Current estimates suggest that nearly half a billion people worldwide are affected by hearing loss. Because of the major psychological, social, economic, and health ramifications, considerable efforts have been invested in identifying the genes and molecular pathways involved in hearing loss, whether genetic or environmental, to promote prevention, improve rehabilitation, and develop therapeutics. Genomic sequencing technologies have led to the discovery of genes associated with hearing loss. Studies of the transcriptome and epigenome of the inner ear have characterized key regulators and pathways involved in the development of the inner ear and have paved the way for their use in regenerative medicine. In parallel, the immense preclinical success of using viral vectors for gene delivery in animal models of hearing loss has motivated the industry to work on translating such approaches into the clinic. Here, we review the recent advances in the genomics of auditory function and dysfunction, from patient diagnostics to epigenetics and gene therapy.

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2022-08-31
2024-04-16
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