1932

Abstract

During development innate lymphoid cells and specialized lymphocyte subsets colonize peripheral tissues, where they contribute to organogenesis and later constitute the first line of protection while maintaining tissue homeostasis. A few of these subsets are produced only during embryonic development and remain in the tissues throughout life. They are generated through a unique developmental program initiated in lympho-myeloid-primed progenitors, which lose myeloid and B cell potential. They either differentiate into innate lymphoid cells or migrate to the thymus to give rise to embryonic T cell receptor–invariant T cells. At later developmental stages, adaptive T lymphocytes are derived from lympho-myeloid progenitors that colonize the thymus, while lymphoid progenitors become specialized in the production of B cells. This sequence of events highlights the requirement for stratification in the establishment of immune functions that determine efficient seeding of peripheral tissues by a limited number of cells.

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2019-04-26
2024-06-14
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