1932

Abstract

It is difficult to believe that in about 1960 practically nothing was known about the thymus and some of its products, T cells bearing αβ receptors for antigen. Thus I was lucky to join the field of T cell biology almost at its beginning, when knowledge about the cells was just getting off the ground and there was so much to discover. This article describes findings about these cells made by others and myself that led us all from ignorance, via complete confusion, to our current state of knowledge. I believe I was fortunate to practice science in very supportive institutions and with very collaborative colleagues in two countries that both encourage independent research by independent scientists, while simultaneously ignoring or somehow being able to avoid some of the difficulties of being a woman in what was, at the time, a male-dominated profession.

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2020-04-26
2024-04-24
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