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Abstract

Modulation of the immune system is an important therapeutic strategy in a wide range of diseases, and is fundamental to the development of vaccines. However, optimally safe and effective immunotherapy requires precision in the delivery of stimulatory cues to the right cells at the right place and time, to avoid toxic overstimulation in healthy tissues or incorrect programming of the immune response. To this end, biomaterials are being developed to control the location, dose, and timing of vaccines and immunotherapies. Here we discuss fundamental concepts of how biomaterials are used to enhance immune modulation, and evidence from preclinical and clinical studies of how biomaterials-mediated immune engineering can impact the development of new therapeutics. We focus on immunological mechanisms of action and in vivo modulation of the immune system, and we also discuss challenges to be overcome to speed translation of these technologies to the clinic.

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2023-04-26
2024-06-14
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