1932

Abstract

This review describes the ways in which contemporary forms of prejudice and stereotypes, which are often subtle and unconscious, give rise to critical problems throughout the legal system. This summary highlights dominant themes and understudied issues at the intersection of legal and psychological research. Three areas of focus are considered: law enforcement (policing), legal decision making, and the legal profession. Recommendations for future research and practice are offered.

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2019-10-13
2024-04-19
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