1932

Abstract

Refugees have an increasing global significance, as their numbers continue to grow and the nature of displacement continues to evolve. Different international, state, and local laws and policies play a part in refugee crises. On the one hand, then, it is important to theorize the role of the law in shaping different formations of displacement; on the other, it is also crucial to address how the people involved in these crises (government officials, street-level bureaucrats, forced migrants, and receiving populations) engage with the law. We highlight and develop three areas of sociolegal inquiry that can push forward the study of the law and politics of refuge: () the uneven geography shaping the global humanitarian machine; () the local contexts within which such a machine operates, interacting with different actors’ conceptualizations of justice; and () the distinct dilemmas that the urban environment poses to both refugees and humanitarians. Advancing these areas of sociolegal inquiry requires enriching established theoretical sources in refugee studies with both neglected ones, such as postcolonial theory and Pierre Bourdieu's sociology of forced displacement, and newer ones, such as Didier Fassin's anthropology of morality and pragmatic sociology of ordinary judgments of fairness.

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2019-10-13
2024-06-24
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