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Abstract

Intersectionality as a framework and praxis has gathered significance in law and the social sciences over the past 20 years. This article begins by reviewing how intersectionality has been conceptualized, as well as the implications of varying definitions attributed to intersectionality. We then explore applications of intersectionality, first in research that focuses on uncovering processes of differentiation and systems of inequality across a range of topics, including reproductive rights, colonization, religion, immigration, and political behavior. After examining these processes and systems, we turn to a second research approach that focuses on categories of difference and between-category relationships. We find that despite different views on conceptualization, application, and implications, intersectionality may nevertheless open new avenues of inquiry for scholars as well as opportunities for transformative coalition building in social movements and grassroots organizations.

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Erratum: Intersectionality: From Theory to Practice
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2019-10-13
2024-04-20
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