1932

Abstract

Natural wood has been used for construction, fuel, and furniture for thousands of years because of its versatility, renewability, and aesthetic appeal. However, new opportunities for wood are arising as researchers have developed ways to tune the material's optical, thermal, mechanical, and ionic transport properties by chemically and physically modifying wood's naturally porous structure and chemical composition. Such modifications can be used to produce sustainable, functional materials for various emerging applications such as automobiles, construction, energy storage, and environmental remediation. In this review, we highlight recent advancements in engineered wood for sustainable technologies, including thermal and light management, environmental remediation, nanofluidics, batteries, and structural materials with high strength-to-weight ratios. Additionally, the current challenges, opportunities, and future of wood research are discussed, providing a guideline for the further development of next-generation, sustainable wood-based materials.

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2023-07-03
2024-04-15
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