1932

Abstract

If variety is the spice of life, then abnormal grain growth (AGG) may be the materials processing equivalent of sriracha sauce. Abnormally growing grains can be prismatic, dendritic, or practically any shape in between. When they grow at least an order of magnitude larger than their neighbors in the matrix—a state we call extreme AGG—we can examine the abnormal/matrix interface for clues to the underlying mechanism. Simulating AGG for various formulations of the grain boundary (GB) equation of motion, we show that anisotropies in GB mobility and energy leave a characteristic fingerprint in the abnormal/matrix boundary. Except in the case of prismatic growth, the morphological signature of most reported instances of AGG is consistent with a certain degree of GB mobility variability. Open questions remain, however, concerning the mechanism by which the corresponding growth advantage is established and maintained as the GBs of abnormal grains advance through the matrix.

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2023-07-03
2024-04-15
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