1932

Abstract

Risk assessments are integral for the prevention and management of cardiometabolic disease (CMD). However, individuals may develop CMD without traditional risk factors, necessitating the development of novel biomarkers to aid risk prediction. The emergence of omic technologies, including genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, has allowed for assessment of orthogonal measures of cardiometabolic risk, potentially improving the ability for novel biomarkers to refine disease risk assessments. While omics has shed light on novel mechanisms for the development of CMD, its adoption in clinical practice faces significant challenges. We review select omic technologies and cardiometabolic investigations for risk prediction, while highlighting challenges and opportunities for translating findings to clinical practice.

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2020-01-27
2024-06-14
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