1932

Abstract

Complement constitutes a major part of the innate immune system. The study of complement in human health has historically focused on infection risks associated with complement protein deficiencies; however, recent interest in the field has focused on overactivation of complement as a cause of immune injury and the development of anticomplement therapies to treat human diseases. The kidneys are particularly sensitive to complement injury, and anticomplement therapies for several kidney diseases have been investigated. Overactivation of complement can result from loss-of-function mutations in complement regulators; gain-of-function mutations in key complement proteins such as C3 and factor B; or autoantibody production, infection, or tissue stresses, such as ischemia and reperfusion, that perturb the balance of complement activation and regulation. Here, we provide a high-level review of the status of anticomplement therapies, with an emphasis on the transition from rare diseases to more common kidney diseases.

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2024-01-29
2024-06-20
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