1932

Abstract

In the last decade, over a dozen potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) to several HIV envelope protein epitopes have been identified, and their in vitro neutralization profiles have been defined. Many have demonstrated prevention efficacy in preclinical trials and favorable safety and pharmacokinetic profiles in early human clinical trials. The first human prevention efficacy trials using 10 sequential, every-two-month administrations of a single anti-HIV bnAb are anticipated to conclude in 2020. Combinations of complementary bnAbs and multi-specific bnAbs exhibit improved breadth and potency over most individual antibodies and are entering advanced clinical development. Genetic engineering of the Fc regions has markedly improved bnAb half-life, increased mucosal tissue concentrations of antibodies (especially in the genital tract), and enhanced immunomodulatory and Fc effector functionality, all of which improve antibodies' preventative and therapeutic potential. Human-derived monoclonal antibodies are likely to enter the realm of primary care prevention and therapy for viral infections in the near future.

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2020-01-27
2024-06-16
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