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Abstract

Microbial communities enmeshed in a matrix of macromolecules, termed as biofilms, are the natural setting of bacteria. Exopolysaccharide is a critical matrix component of biofilms. Here, we focus on biofilm matrix exopolysaccharides in . This opportunistic pathogen can adapt to a wide range of environments and can form biofilms or aggregates in a variety of surfaces or environments, such as the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis, catheters, wounds, and contact lenses. The ability to synthesize multiple exopolysaccharides is one of the advantages that facilitate bacterial survival in different environments. can produce several exopolysaccharides, including alginate, Psl, Pel, and lipopolysaccharide. In this review, we highlight the roles of each exopolysaccharide in biofilm development and how bacteria coordinate the biosynthesis of multiple exopolysaccharides and bacterial motility. In addition, we present advances in antibiofilm strategies targeting matrix exopolysaccharides, with a focus on glycoside hydrolases.

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2022-09-08
2024-06-18
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