1932

Abstract

Malaria vaccine development has rapidly advanced in the past decade. The very first phase 3 clinical trial of the RTS,S vaccine was completed with over 15,000 African infants and children, and pilot implementation studies are underway. Next-generation candidate vaccines using novel antigens, platforms, or approaches targeting different and/or multiple stages of the life cycle are being tested. Many candidates, in various stages of development, promise enhanced efficacy of long duration and broad protection against genetically diverse malaria strains, with a few studies under way in target populations in endemic areas. Malaria vaccines together with other interventions promise interruption and eventual elimination of malaria in endemic areas.

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2018-09-08
2024-04-19
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