1932

Abstract

Emotions are fundamental to our experience and behavior, affecting and motivating all aspects of our lives. Scientists of various disciplines have been fascinated by emotions for centuries, yet even today vigorous debates abound about how to define emotions and how to best study their neural underpinnings. Defining emotions from an evolutionary perspective and acknowledging their important functional roles in supporting survival allows the study of emotion states in diverse species. This approach enables taking advantage of modern tools in behavioral, systems, and circuit neurosciences, allowing the precise dissection of neural mechanisms and behavior underlying emotion processes in model organisms. Here we review findings about the neural circuit mechanisms underlying emotion processing across species and try to identify points of convergence as well as important next steps in the pursuit of understanding how emotions emerge from neural activity.

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2023-07-10
2024-04-22
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