1932

Abstract

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic fatty liver disease worldwide, particularly in obese and type 2 diabetic individuals. Currently, there are no therapies for NAFLD that have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Herein, we examine the rationale for using ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in NAFLD therapy. This focus is based on the finding that NAFLD severity is associated with a reduction of hepatic C ω3 PUFAs. Because C ω3 PUFAs are pleiotropic regulators of cell function, loss of C ω3 PUFAs has the potential to significantly impact hepatic function. We describe NAFLD prevalence and pathophysiology as well as current NAFLD therapies. We also present evidence from clinical and preclinical studies that evaluated the capacity of C ω3 PUFAs to treat NAFLD. Given the clinical and preclinical evidence, dietary C ω3 PUFA supplementation has the potential to decrease human NAFLD severity by reducing hepatosteatosis and liver injury.

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2023-08-21
2024-06-21
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