1932

Abstract

Writing this biography forced me to look back over my career as a scientist, teacher, wife, and mother. To my surprise, a lifelong theme emerged that I was unaware of, that is, the role of maintaining balance between work and family, science and teaching, mentorship and administration, and personal values and challenges. My primary mentor, Dr. Doris Calloway, demonstrated the importance of maintaining balance. My interest in nutrition started as a preschooler living on a farm where I learned firsthand the importance of balancing the expense of providing good nutrition to the livestock with potential income. In our small high school, I became acquainted with the fascinating field of chemistry, but found it critical to balance that interest with a politically correct field of study for a woman in the early 1960s. I chose dietetics for its strong roots in chemistry. As a US Army dietitian, I learned firsthand how to conduct metabolic studies and knew, immediately, that I had to balance that interest with future opportunities feasible for a dietitian. I chose the University of California, Berkeley, for my PhD because it needed to train dietitians in research to balance an emerging need to offer undergraduates a practicum in dietetics. My subsequent faculty appointment there enabled me to develop novel isotopic approaches for studying zinc and prenatal nutrition, and balance my research with teaching and administrative responsibilities. During the next 40 years, my work as a Berkeley professor led to appointments at the Western Human Nutrition Research Center and Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, while balancing my responsibilities as a wife and a mother to my two sons. Balance is defined as a condition in which different elements are equal or in the correct proportions. It is extremely satisfying to look back and see evidence of successfully balancing the disparate elements of my career.

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2019-08-21
2024-06-20
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