1932

Abstract

Derived from the term exposure, the exposome is an omic-scale characterization of the nongenetic drivers of health and disease. With the genome, it defines the phenome of an individual. The measurement of complex environmental factors that exert pressure on our health has not kept pace with genomics and historically has not provided a similar level of resolution. Emerging technologies make it possible to obtain detailed information on drugs, toxicants, pollutants, nutrients, and physical and psychological stressors on an omic scale. These forces can also be assessed at systems and network levels, providing a framework for advances in pharmacology and toxicology. The exposome paradigm can improve the analysis of drug interactions and detection of adverse effects of drugs and toxicants and provide data on biological responses to exposures. The comprehensive model can provide data at the individual level for precision medicine, group level for clinical trials, and population level for public health.

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2019-01-06
2024-04-13
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