1932

Abstract

Chronic pain treatment remains a sore challenge, and in our aging society, the number of patients reporting inadequate pain relief continues to grow. Current treatment options all have their drawbacks, including limited efficacy and the propensity of abuse and addiction; the latter is exemplified by the ongoing opioid crisis. Extensive research in the last few decades has focused on mechanisms underlying chronic pain states, thereby producing attractive opportunities for novel, effective and safe pharmaceutical interventions. Members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family represent innovative targets to tackle pain sensation at the root. Three TRP channels, TRPV1, TRPM3, and TRPA1, are of particular interest, as they were identified as sensors of chemical- and heat-induced pain in nociceptor neurons. This review summarizes the knowledge regarding TRP channel–based pain therapies, including the bumpy road of the clinical development of TRPV1 antagonists, the current status of TRPA1 antagonists, and the future potential of targeting TRPM3.

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2021-01-06
2024-06-20
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