1932

Abstract

I am deeply honored to be invited to write this scientific autobiography. As a physician-scientist, pediatrician, molecular biologist, and geneticist, I have authored/coauthored more than 600 publications in the fields of clinical medicine, biochemistry, biophysics, pharmacology, drug metabolism, toxicology, molecular biology, cancer, standardized gene nomenclature, developmental toxicology and teratogenesis, mouse genetics, human genetics, and evolutionary genomics. Looking back, I think my career can be divided into four distinct research areas, which I summarize mostly chronologically in this article: () discovery and characterization of the AHR/CYP1 axis, () pharmacogenomics and genetic prediction of response to drugs and other environmental toxicants, () standardized drug-metabolizing gene nomenclature based on evolutionary divergence, and () discovery and characterization of the gene encoding the ZIP8 metal cation influx transporter. Collectively, all four topics embrace gene-environment interactions, hence the title of my autobiography.

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2024-01-23
2024-06-17
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