1932

Abstract

Arsenic is a naturally occurring metalloid and one of the few metals that can be metabolized inside the human body. The pervasive presence of arsenic in nature and anthropogenic sources from agricultural and medical use have perpetuated human exposure to this toxic and carcinogenic element. Highly exposed individuals are susceptible to various illnesses, including skin disorders; cognitive impairment; and cancers of the lung, liver, and kidneys. In fact, across the globe, approximately 200 million people are exposed to potentially toxic levels of arsenic, which has prompted substantial research and mitigation efforts to combat this extensive public health issue. This review provides an up-to-date look at arsenic-related challenges facing the global community, including current sources of arsenic, global disease burden, arsenic resistance, and shortcomings of ongoing mitigation measures, and discusses potential next steps.

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An erratum has been published for this article:
Erratum: Arsenic: A Global Environmental Challenge
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2021-01-06
2024-06-13
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