1932

Abstract

This review explores how different classes of drugs, including those with therapeutic and abuse potential, alter brain functions and behavior via the epigenome. Epigenetics, in its simplest interpretation, is the study of the regulation of a genes’ transcriptional potential. The epigenome is established during development but is malleable throughout life by a wide variety of drugs, with both clinical utility and abuse potential. An epigenetic effect can be central to the drug's therapeutic or abuse potential, or it can be independent from the main effect but nevertheless produce beneficial or adverse side effects. Here, I discuss the various epigenetic effects of main pharmacological drug classes, including antidepressants, antiepileptics, and drugs of abuse.

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2021-01-06
2024-06-19
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