1932

Abstract

Oxidative injury due to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species is implicated in cardiovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease, lung and liver diseases, and many cancers. Antioxidant therapies have generally been ineffective at treating these diseases, potentially due to ineffective doses but also due to interference with critical host defense and signaling processes. Therefore, alternative strategies to prevent oxidative injury are needed. Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species induce lipid peroxidation, generating reactive lipid dicarbonyls. These lipid oxidation products may be the most salient mediators of oxidative injury, as they cause cellular and organ dysfunction by adducting to proteins, lipids, and DNA. Small-molecule compounds have been developed in the past decade to selectively and effectively scavenge these reactive lipid dicarbonyls. This review outlines evidence supporting the role of lipid dicarbonyls in disease pathogenesis, as well as preclinical data supporting the efficacy of novel dicarbonyl scavengers in treating or preventing disease.

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2021-01-06
2024-06-20
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