1932

Abstract

Cell-based immunotherapies using T cells that are engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-T cells) are an effective treatment option for several B cell malignancies. Compared with most drugs, CAR-T cell products are highly complex, as each cell product is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of millions of cells. The biodistribution and kinetics of CAR-T cells, following administration, are unique given the ability of T cells to actively migrate as well as replicate within the patient. CAR-T cell therapies also have multiple mechanisms of action that contribute to both their antitumor activity and their toxicity. This review provides an overview of the unique pharmacology of CAR-T cells, with a focus on CD19-targeting and B cell maturation antigen (BCMA)-targeting CAR-T cells.

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2021-01-06
2024-06-17
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