1932

Abstract

Each year over half a million people experience permanent hearing loss caused by treatment with therapeutic drugs with ototoxic side effects. There is a major unmet clinical need for therapies that protect against this hearing loss without reducing the therapeutic efficacy of these lifesaving drugs. At least 17 clinical trials evaluating 10 therapeutics are currently underway for therapies aimed at preventing aminoglycoside- and/or cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. This review describes the preclinical and clinical development of each of these approaches, provides updates on the status of ongoing trials, and highlights the importance of appropriate outcome measures in trial design and the value of reporting criteria in the dissemination of results.

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2024-01-23
2024-06-21
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/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-pharmtox-033123-114106
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