1932

Abstract

Ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, ATP-sensitive potassium (K) channels couple cellular metabolism to electrical activity in multiple tissues; their unique assembly as four Kir6 pore-forming subunits and four sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) subunits has resulted in a large armory of selective channel opener and inhibitor drugs. The spectrum of monogenic pathologies that result from gain- or loss-of-function mutations in these channels, and the potential for therapeutic correction of these pathologies, is now clear. However, while available drugs can be effective treatments for specific pathologies, cross-reactivity with the other Kir6 or SUR subfamily members can result in drug-induced versions of each pathology and may limit therapeutic usefulness. This review discusses the background to K channel physiology, pathology, and pharmacology and considers the potential for more specific or effective therapeutic agents.

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2023-01-20
2024-04-14
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