1932

Abstract

Modern antiretroviral therapy safely, potently, and durably suppresses human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that, if left untreated, predictably causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), which has been responsible for tens of millions of deaths globally since it was described in 1981. In one of the most extraordinary medical success stories in modern times, a combination of pioneering basic science, innovative drug development, and ambitious public health programming resulted in access to lifesaving, safe drugs, taken as an oral tablet daily, for most of the world. However, substantial challenges remain in the fields of prevention, timely access to diagnosis, and treatment, especially in pediatric and adolescent patients. As HIV-positive adults age, treating their comorbidities will require understanding the course of different chronic diseases complicated by HIV-related and antiretroviral toxicities and finding potential treatments. Finally, new long-acting antiretrovirals on the horizon promise exciting new options in both the prevention and treatment fields.

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2023-01-20
2024-06-20
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