1932

Abstract

The air–water interface is ubiquitous in nature, as manifested in the form of the surfaces of oceans, lakes, and atmospheric aerosols. The aerosol interface, in particular, can play a crucial role in atmospheric chemistry. The adsorption of atmospheric species onto and into aerosols modifies their concentrations and chemistries. Moreover, the aerosol phase allows otherwise unlikely solution-phase chemistry to occur in the atmosphere. The effect of the air–water interface on these processes is not entirely known. This review summarizes recent theoretical investigations of the interactions of atmosphere species with the air–water interface, including reactant adsorption, photochemistry, and the spectroscopy of reactants at the water surface, with an emphasis on understanding differences between interfacial chemistries and the chemistries in both bulk solution and the gas phase. The results discussed here enable an understanding of fundamental concepts that lead to potential air–water interface effects, providing a framework to understand the effects of water surfaces on our atmosphere.

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2019-06-14
2024-04-16
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