1932

Abstract

Molecular polaritons result from light-matter coupling between optical resonances and molecular electronic or vibrational transitions. When the coupling is strong enough, new hybridized states with mixed photon-material character are observed spectroscopically, with resonances shifted above and below the uncoupled frequency. These new modes have unique optical properties and can be exploited to promote or inhibit physical and chemical processes. One remarkable result is that vibrational strong coupling to cavities can alter reaction rates and product branching ratios with no optical excitation whatsoever. In this work we review the ability of vibration-cavity polaritons to modify chemical and physical processes including chemical reactivity, as well as steady-state and transient spectroscopy. We discuss the larger context of these works and highlight their most important contributions and implications. Our goal is to provide insight for systematically manipulating molecular polaritons in photonic and chemical applications.

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2022-04-20
2024-06-16
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