1932

Abstract

Although, as the major organ of gas exchange, the lung is considered a nonlymphoid organ, an interconnected network of lung-resident innate cells, including epithelial cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, and natural killer cells is crucial for its protection. These cells provide defense against a daily assault by airborne bacteria, viruses, and fungi, as well as prevent the development of cancer, allergy, and the outgrowth of commensals. Our understanding of this innate immune environment has recently changed with the discovery of a family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs): ILC1s, ILC2s, and ILC3s. All lack adaptive antigen receptors but can provide a substantial and rapid source of IFN-γ, IL-5 and IL-13, and IL-17A or IL-22, respectively. Their ability to afford immediate protection to the lung and to influence subsequent adaptive immune responses highlights the importance of understanding ILC-regulated immunity for the design of future therapeutic interventions.

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2019-02-10
2024-06-20
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