1932

Abstract

Tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) describes the negative relationship between () NaCl concentration at the macula densa and () glomerular filtration rate or glomerular capillary pressure. TGF-induced vasoconstriction of the afferent arteriole results from the enhanced effect of several vasoconstrictors with an effect size sequence of adenosine = 20-HETE > angiotensin II > thromboxane = superoxide > renal nerves > ATP. TGF-mediated vasoconstriction is limited by the simultaneous release of several vasodilators with an effect size sequence of nitric oxide > carbon monoxide = kinins > adenosine. The sum of the constrictor effects exceeds that of the dilator effects by the magnitude of the TGF response. The validity of the additive model used in this analysis can be tested by determining the effect of combined inhibition of some or all agents contributing to TGF. Multiple independent contributors to TGF are consistent with the variability of TGF and of the factors contributing to TGF resetting.

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2015-02-10
2024-06-20
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