1932

Abstract

The interplay between diet, the gut microbiome, and host health is complex. Diets associated with health have many similarities: high fiber, unsaturated fatty acids, and polyphenols while being low in saturated fats, sodium, and refined carbohydrates. Over the past several decades, dietary patterns have changed significantly in Westernized nations with the increased consumption of calorically dense ultraprocessed foods low in fiber and high in saturated fats, salt, and refined carbohydrates, leading to numerous negative health consequences including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. The gut microbiota is an environmental factor that interacts with diet and may also have an impact on health outcomes, many of which involve metabolites produced by the microbiota from dietary components that can impact the host. This review focuses on our current understanding of the complex relationship between diet, the gut microbiota, and host health, with examples of how diet can support health, increase an individual's risk for disease, and be used as a therapy for specific diseases.

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2023-02-10
2024-06-20
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