1932

Abstract

Adipose tissue depots in distinct anatomical locations mediate key aspects of metabolism, including energy storage, nutrient release, and thermogenesis. Although adipocytes make up more than 90% of adipose tissue volume, they represent less than 50% of its cellular content. Here, I review recent advances in genetic lineage tracing and transcriptomics that reveal the identities of the heterogeneous cell populations constituting mouse and human adipose tissues. In addition to mature adipocytes and their progenitors, these include endothelial and various immune cell types that together orchestrate adipose tissue development and functions. One salient finding is the identification of progenitor subtypes that can modulate adipogenic capacity through paracrine mechanisms. Another is the description of fate trajectories of monocyte/macrophages, which can respond maladaptively to nutritional and thermogenic stimuli, leading to metabolic disease. These studies have generated an extraordinary source of publicly available data that can be leveraged to explore commonalities and differences among experimental models, providing new insights into adipose tissues and their role in metabolic disease.

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2021-02-10
2024-04-16
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