1932

Abstract

The human lung cellular portfolio, traditionally characterized by cellular morphology and individual markers, is highly diverse, with over 40 cell types and a complex branching structure highly adapted for agile airflow and gas exchange. While constant during adulthood, lung cellular content changes in response to exposure, injury, and infection. Some changes are temporary, but others are persistent, leading to structural changes and progressive lung disease. The recent advance of single-cell profiling technologies allows an unprecedented level of detail and scale to cellular measurements, leading to the rise of comprehensive cell atlas styles of reporting. In this review, we chronical the rise of cell atlases and explore their contributions to human lung biology in health and disease.

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2023-02-10
2024-06-14
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