1932

Abstract

Studies in preclinical models support that the gut microbiota play a critical role in the development and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). Specific microbial species and their corresponding virulence factors or associated small molecules can contribute to CRC development and progression either via direct effects on the neoplastic transformation of epithelial cells or through interactions with the host immune system. Induction of DNA damage, activation of Wnt/β-catenin and NF-κB proinflammatory pathways, and alteration of the nutrient's availability and the metabolic activity of cancer cells are the main mechanisms by which the microbiota contribute to CRC. Within the tumor microenvironment, the gut microbiota alter the recruitment, activation, and function of various immune cells, such as T cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Additionally, the microbiota shape the function and composition of cancer-associated fibroblasts and extracellular matrix components, fashioning an immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic niche for CRC. Understanding the complex interplay between gut microbiota and tumorigenesis can provide therapeutic opportunities for the prevention and treatment of CRC.

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2024-02-12
2024-06-21
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