1932

Abstract

Detection, identification, and quantification of plant diseases by sensor techniques are expected to enable a more precise disease control, as sensors are sensitive, objective, and highly available for disease assessment. Recent progress in sensor technology and data processing is very promising; nevertheless, technical constraints and issues inherent to variability in host–pathogen interactions currently limit the use of sensors in various fields of application. The information from spectral [e.g., RGB (red, green, blue)], multispectral, and hyperspectral sensors that measure reflectance, fluorescence, and emission of radiation or from electronic noses that detect volatile organic compounds released from plants or pathogens, as well as the potential of sensors to characterize the health status of crops, is evaluated based on the recent literature. Phytopathological aspects of remote sensing of plant diseases across different scales and for various purposes are discussed, including spatial disease patterns, epidemic spread of pathogens, crop characteristics, and links to disease control. Future challenges in sensor use are identified.

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2020-08-25
2024-06-22
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