1932

Abstract

Our understanding of the ecological interactions between plant viruses, their insect vectors, and their host plants has increased rapidly over the past decade. The suite of viruses known collectively as the yellow dwarf viruses infect an extensive range of cultivated and noncultivated grasses worldwide and is one of the best-studied plant virus systems. The yellow dwarf viruses are ubiquitous in cereal crops, where they can significantly limit yields, and there is growing recognition that they are also ubiquitous in grassland ecosystems, where they can influence community dynamics. Here, we discuss recent research that has explored () the extent and impact of yellow dwarf viruses in a diversity of plant communities, () the role of vector behavior in virus transmission, and () the prospects for impacts of climate change—including rising temperatures, drought, and elevated CO—on the epidemiology of yellow dwarf viruses.

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-phyto-020620-101848
2022-08-26
2024-06-24
Loading full text...

Full text loading...

/deliver/fulltext/phyto/60/1/annurev-phyto-020620-101848.html?itemId=/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-phyto-020620-101848&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah

Literature Cited

  1. 1.
    A'Brook J. 1973. Observations on different methods of aphid trapping. Ann. Appl. Biol. 74:3263–77
    [Google Scholar]
  2. 2.
    Ajayi O, Dewar AM. 1983. The effect of barley yellow dwarf virus on field populations of the cereal aphids, Sitobion avenae and Metopolophium dirhodum. Ann. Appl. Biol. 103:11–11
    [Google Scholar]
  3. 3.
    Ajayi O. 1986. The effect of barley yellow dwarf virus on the amino acid composition of spring wheat. Ann. Appl. Biol. 108:145–49
    [Google Scholar]
  4. 4.
    Alexander HM, Bruns E, Schebor H, Malmstrom CM. 2017. Crop-associated virus infection in a native perennial grass: reduction in plant fitness and dynamic patterns of virus detection. J. Ecol. 105:41021–31
    [Google Scholar]
  5. 5.
    Alexander HM, Mauck KE, Whitfield AE, Garrett KA, Malmstrom CM. 2014. Plant-virus interactions and the agro-ecological interface. Eur. J. Plant Pathol. 138:3529–47
    [Google Scholar]
  6. 6.
    Ansi A, Kumari SG, Haj Kasem A, Makkouk KM, Muharram I 2007. The occurrence of Barley yellow dwarf viruses on cereal crops and wild grasses in Syria. Arab J. Plant Prot. 25:1–9
    [Google Scholar]
  7. 7.
    Araya JE, Foster JE. 1987. Laboratory study on the effects of barley yellow dwarf virus on the life cycle of Rhopalosiphum padi (L.). J. Plant Dis. Prot. 94:6578–83
    [Google Scholar]
  8. 8.
    Aslam TJ, Johnson SN, Karley AJ 2013. Plant-mediated effects of drought on aphid population structure and parasitoid attack. J. Appl. Entomol. 137:1–2136–45
    [Google Scholar]
  9. 9.
    Bach EM, Kleiman BP. 2021. Twenty years of tallgrass prairie restoration in northern Illinois, USA. Ecol. Solut. Evid. 2:4e12101
    [Google Scholar]
  10. 10.
    Bailey SM, Irwin ME, Kampmeier GE, Eastman CE, Hewings AD. 1995. Physical and biological perturbations: their effect on the movement of apterous Rhopalosiphum padi (Homoptera: Aphididae) and localized spread of barley yellow dwarf virus. Environ. Entomol. 24:124–33
    [Google Scholar]
  11. 11.
    Bekele B, Kumari S, Ahmed S, Fininsa C, Yusuf A, Abraham A. 2018. Non-cultivated grass hosts of yellow dwarf viruses in Ethiopia and their epidemiological consequences on cultivated cereals. J. Phytopathol. 166:2103–15
    [Google Scholar]
  12. 12.
    Bekele B, Makkouk KM, Yusuf A, Alemayu F, Lencho A. 2001. Occurrence and distribution of barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) isolates in central Ethiopia. Int. J. Pest Manag. 47:2115–19
    [Google Scholar]
  13. 13.
    Borer ET, Hosseini PR, Seabloom EW, Dobson AP. 2007. Pathogen-induced reversal of native dominance in a grassland community. PNAS 104:135473–78
    [Google Scholar]
  14. 14.
    Borer ET, Mitchell CE, Power AG, Seabloom EW. 2009. Consumers indirectly increase infection risk in grassland food webs. PNAS 106:2503–6
    [Google Scholar]
  15. 15.
    Borer ET, Seabloom EW, Mitchell CE, Power AG. 2010. Local context drives infection of grasses by vector-borne generalist viruses: local vs. regional context and infection risk. Ecol. Lett. 13:7810–18
    [Google Scholar]
  16. 16.
    Bosque-Pérez NA, Eigenbrode SD. 2011. The influence of virus-induced changes in plants on aphid vectors: insights from luteovirus pathosystems. Virus Res 159:2201–5
    [Google Scholar]
  17. 17.
    Canadell JG, Scheel Monteiro P, Costa MH, Cotrim da Cunha L, Cox PM et al. 2021. Global carbon and other biogeochemical cycles and feedbacks. Climate Change 2021: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Sixth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change V Masson-Delmotte, P Zhai, A Pirani, SL Connors, C Péan et al. New York: Cambridge Univ. Press
    [Google Scholar]
  18. 18.
    Canto T, Aranda MA, Fereres A. 2009. Climate change effects on physiology and population processes of hosts and vectors that influence the spread of hemipteran-borne plant viruses. Glob. Change Biol. 15:81884–94
    [Google Scholar]
  19. 19.
    Chellappan P, Vanitharani R, Ogbe F, Fauquet CM. 2005. Effect of temperature on geminivirus-induced RNA silencing in plants. Plant Physiol 138:41828–41
    [Google Scholar]
  20. 20.
    Chrpová J, Veškrna O, Palicová J, Kundu JK. 2020. The evaluation of wheat cultivar resistance and yield loss thresholds in response to Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV infection. Agriculture 10:120
    [Google Scholar]
  21. 21.
    Creamer R, Falk BW. 1990. Direct detection of transcapsidated barley yellow dwarf luteoviruses in doubly infected plants. J. Gen. Virol. 71:1211–17
    [Google Scholar]
  22. 22.
    Dáder B, Fereres A, Moreno A, Trębicki P. 2016. Elevated CO2 impacts bell pepper growth with consequences to Myzus persicae life history, feeding behaviour and virus transmission ability. Sci Rep 6:119120
    [Google Scholar]
  23. 23.
    D'Arcy C, Burnett PA, eds. 1995. Barley Yellow Dwarf: 40 Years of Progress St. Paul, MN: APS Press
    [Google Scholar]
  24. 24.
    Davis TS, Bosque-Pérez NA, Foote NE, Magney T, Eigenbrode SD. 2015. Environmentally dependent host-pathogen and vector-pathogen interactions in the Barley yellow dwarf virus pathosystem. J. Appl. Ecol. 52:51392–1401
    [Google Scholar]
  25. 25.
    Debarro PJ, Maelzer DA. 1993. Influence of high temperatures on the survival of Rhopalosiphum padi (L.) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in irrigated perennial grass pastures in South Australia. Aust. J. Zool. 41:2123–32
    [Google Scholar]
  26. 26.
    Delmiglio C, Pearson MN, Lister RA, Guy PL. 2010. Incidence of cereal and pasture viruses in New Zealand's native grasses. Ann. Appl. Biol. 157:125–36
    [Google Scholar]
  27. 27.
    Deutsch CA, Tewksbury JJ, Tigchelaar M, Battisti DS, Merrill SC et al. 2018. Increase in crop losses to insect pests in a warming climate. Science 361:6405916–19
    [Google Scholar]
  28. 28.
    Dewar AM, Foster SP. 2017. Overuse of pyrethroids may be implicated in the recent BYDV epidemics in cereals. Outlook Pest Manag 28:17–12
    [Google Scholar]
  29. 29.
    Domier LL. 2008. Barley yellow dwarf viruses. Encyclopedia of Virology BWJ Mahy, MHV Van Regenmortel 279–86 Oxford, UK: Academic. , 3rd ed..
    [Google Scholar]
  30. 30.
    Döring TF, Chittka L. 2007. Visual ecology of aphids—a critical review on the role of colours in host finding. Arthropod-Plant Interact 1:13–16
    [Google Scholar]
  31. 31.
    dos Santos RC, Peñaflor MFGV, Sanches PA, Nardi C, Bento JMS. 2016. The effects of Gibberella zeae, Barley yellow dwarf virus, and co-infection on Rhopalosiphum padi olfactory preference and performance. Phytoparasitica 44:147–54
    [Google Scholar]
  32. 32.
    Drake BG, Gonzàlez-Meler MA, Long SP. 1997. More efficient plants: a consequence of rising atmospheric CO2?. Annu. Rev. Plant Physiol. Plant Mol. Biol. 48:609–39
    [Google Scholar]
  33. 33.
    Fereres A, Moreno A. 2009. Behavioural aspects influencing plant virus transmission by homopteran insects. Virus Res 141:2158–68
    [Google Scholar]
  34. 34.
    Fereres A, Shukle RH, Araya JE, Foster JE. 1990. Probing and feeding behavior of Sitobion avenae (F.) (Horn., Aphididae) on three wheat cultivars infected with barley yellow dwarf virus. J. Appl. Entomol. 109:1–529–36
    [Google Scholar]
  35. 35.
    Fiebig M, Poehling H-M, Borgemeister C. 2004. Barley yellow dwarf virus, wheat, and Sitobion avenae: a case of trilateral interactions. Entomol. Exp. Appl. 110:111–21
    [Google Scholar]
  36. 36.
    Finlay KJ, Luck JE. 2011. Response of the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi) to climate change in relation to its pest status, vectoring potential and function in a crop-vector-virus pathosystem. Agric. Ecosyst. Environ. 144:1405–21
    [Google Scholar]
  37. 37.
    Garrett KA, Dendy SP, Power AG, Blaisdell GK, Alexander HM, McCarron JK 2004. Barley yellow dwarf disease in natural populations of dominant tallgrass prairie species in Kansas. Plant Dis 88:5574
    [Google Scholar]
  38. 38.
    Gilabert A, Gauffre B, Parisey N, Le Gallic J-F, Lhomme P et al. 2017. Influence of the surrounding landscape on the colonization rate of cereal aphids and phytovirus transmission in autumn. J. Pest Sci. 90:2447–57
    [Google Scholar]
  39. 39.
    Gildow FE. 1980. Increased production of alatae by aphids reared on oats infected with barley yellow dwarf virus. Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 73:3343–47
    [Google Scholar]
  40. 40.
    Gildow FE. 1983. Influence of barley yellow dwarf virus-infected oats and barley on morphology of aphid vectors. Phytopathology 73:81196–99
    [Google Scholar]
  41. 41.
    Gray SM, Power AG, Smith DM, Seaman AJ, Altman NS. 1991. Aphid transmission of barley yellow dwarf virus: inoculation access periods and epidemiological implications. Phytopathology 81:539–45
    [Google Scholar]
  42. 42.
    Griesbach JA, Steffenson BJ, Brown MP, Falk BW, Webster RK. 1990. Infection of grasses by barley yellow dwarf viruses in California. Crop Sci. 30:61173–77
    [Google Scholar]
  43. 43.
    Grman E, Bassett T, Brudvig LA. 2013. Confronting contingency in restoration: management and site history determine outcomes of assembling prairies, but site characteristics and landscape context have little effect. J. Appl. Ecol. 50:51234–43
    [Google Scholar]
  44. 44.
    Hale BK, Bale JS, Pritchard J, Masters GJ, Brown VK. 2003. Effects of host plant drought stress on the performance of the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi (L.): a mechanistic analysis. Ecol. Entomol. 28:6666–77
    [Google Scholar]
  45. 45.
    Hatfield J. 2012. Agriculture in the Midwest US Natl. Clim. Change Assess. Midwest Tech. Input Rep., US Glob. Change Res. Progr. Washington, DC: https://glisa.umich.edu/media/files/NCA/MTIT_Agriculture.pdf
    [Google Scholar]
  46. 46.
    Henry M, Dedryver CA. 1991. Occurrence of barley yellow dwarf virus in pastures of western France. Plant Pathol 40:193–99
    [Google Scholar]
  47. 47.
    Hoffman TK, Kolb FL. 1997. Effects of barley yellow dwarf virus on root and shoot growth of winter wheat seedlings grown in aeroponic culture. Plant Dis 81:5497–500
    [Google Scholar]
  48. 48.
    Huberty AF, Denno RF. 2004. Plant water stress and its consequences for herbivorous insects: a new synthesis. Ecology 85:51383–98
    [Google Scholar]
  49. 49.
    Ingwell LL, Bosque-Pérez NA. 2015. The invasive weed Ventenata dubia is a host of Barley yellow dwarf virus with implications for an endangered grassland habitat. Weed Res 55:162–70
    [Google Scholar]
  50. 50.
    Ingwell LL, Eigenbrode SD, Bosque-Pérez NA. 2012. Plant viruses alter insect behavior to enhance their spread. Sci. Rep. 2:1578
    [Google Scholar]
  51. 51.
    Ingwell LL, Lacroix C, Rhoades PR, Karasev AV, Bosque-Pérez NA. 2017. Agroecological and environmental factors influence Barley yellow dwarf viruses in grasslands in the US Pacific Northwest. Virus Res 241:185–95
    [Google Scholar]
  52. 52.
    Irwin ME, Thresh JM. 1990. Epidemiology of barley yellow dwarf: a study in ecological complexity. Annu. Rev. Phytopathol. 28:393–424
    [Google Scholar]
  53. 53.
    Jarošová J, Chrpová J, Šíp V, Kundu JK. 2013. A comparative study of the Barley yellow dwarf virus species PAV and PAS: distribution, accumulation and host resistance: comparative study of BYDV-PAV and -PAS. Plant Pathol 62:2436–43
    [Google Scholar]
  54. 54.
    Jedlinski H. 1977. Tolerance to barley yellow dwarf virus in oats. Phytopathology 77:111408–11
    [Google Scholar]
  55. 55.
    Jiménez J, Arias-Martín M, Moreno A, Garzo E, Fereres A. 2020. Barley yellow dwarf virus can be inoculated during brief intracellular punctures in phloem cells before the sieve element continuous salivation phase. Phytopathology 110:185–93
    [Google Scholar]
  56. 56.
    Jimenez-Martinez ES, Bosque-Pérez NA, Berger PH, Zemetra RS. 2004. Life history of the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi (Homoptera: Aphididae), on transgenic and untransformed wheat challenged with Barley yellow dwarf virus. J. Econ. Entomol. 97:2203–12
    [Google Scholar]
  57. 57.
    Johnson SN, Staley JT, McLeod FAL, Hartley SE. 2011. Plant-mediated effects of soil invertebrates and summer drought on above-ground multitrophic interactions. J. Ecol. 99:157–65
    [Google Scholar]
  58. 58.
    Jones R, Barbetti M. 2012. Influence of climate change on plant disease infections and epidemics caused by viruses and bacteria. CAB Rev 7:221–31
    [Google Scholar]
  59. 59.
    Jones RAC. 2016. Future scenarios for plant virus pathogens as climate change progresses. Adv. Virus Res. 95:87–147
    [Google Scholar]
  60. 60.
    Kennedy JS, Booth CO, Kershaw WJS. 1961. Host finding by aphids in the field. Ann. Appl. Biol. 49:11–21
    [Google Scholar]
  61. 61.
    Kern M, Meiners T, Schliephake E, Habekuss A, Ordon F, Will T 2022. Infection of susceptible/tolerant barley genotypes with Barley yellow dwarf virus alters the host plant preference of Rhopalosiphum padi clones depending upon their ability to transmit BYDV. J Pest Sci 95:1215–29
    [Google Scholar]
  62. 62.
    Khetarpal RK, Kumar J, Beuve M, Parakh DB, Nath R. 1994. Outbreak of MAV-type barley yellow dwarf virus on wheat in the Garhwal Hills in India. Plant Pathol 43:2415–16
    [Google Scholar]
  63. 63.
    Kieckhefer RW, Dickman DA, Miller EL. 1976. Color responses of cereal aphids. Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 69:721–24
    [Google Scholar]
  64. 64.
    Kimball BA, Idso SB. 1983. Increasing atmospheric CO2: effects on crop yield, water use and climate. Agric. Water Manag. 7:155–72
    [Google Scholar]
  65. 65.
    Kreyling J, Dengler J, Walter J, Velev N, Ugurlu E et al. 2017. Species richness effects on grassland recovery from drought depend on community productivity in a multisite experiment. Ecol. Lett. 20:111405–13
    [Google Scholar]
  66. 66.
    Krueger EN, Beckett RJ, Gray SM, Miller WA. 2013. The complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of Barley yellow dwarf virus-RMV reveals it to be a new Polerovirus distantly related to other yellow dwarf viruses. Front. Microbiol. 4:205
    [Google Scholar]
  67. 67.
    Kundu J, Jarošová J, Gadiou S, Cervená G. 2009. Discrimination of three BYDV species by one-step RT-PCR-RFLP and sequence based methods in cereal plants from the Czech Republic. Cereal Res. Commun. 37:4541–50
    [Google Scholar]
  68. 68.
    Kurppa A, Kurppa S, Hassi A. 1989. Importance of perennial grasses and winter cereals as hosts of barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) related to fluctuations of vector aphid population. Ann. Agric. Fenn. 28:4309–15
    [Google Scholar]
  69. 69.
    Lacroix C, Jolles A, Seabloom EW, Power AG, Mitchell CE, Borer ET. 2014. Non-random biodiversity loss underlies predictable increases in viral disease prevalence. J. R. Soc. Interface 11:9220130947
    [Google Scholar]
  70. 70.
    Leather SR. 1985. Atmospheric humidity and aphid reproduction. Z. Angew. Entomol. 100:1–5510–13
    [Google Scholar]
  71. 71.
    Lesk C, Rowhani P, Ramankutty N. 2016. Influence of extreme weather disasters on global crop production. Nature 529:758484–87
    [Google Scholar]
  72. 72.
    Lucio-Zavaleta E, Smith DM, Gray SM. 2001. Variation in transmission efficiency among Barley yellow dwarf virus-RMV isolates and clones of the normally inefficient aphid vector, Rhopalosiphum padi. Phytopathology 91:8792–96
    [Google Scholar]
  73. 73.
    Ma G, Ma C-S. 2012. Climate warming may increase aphids’ dropping probabilities in response to high temperatures. J. Insect Physiol. 58:111456–62
    [Google Scholar]
  74. 74.
    Ma G, Ma C-S. 2012. Effect of acclimation on heat-escape temperatures of two aphid species: implications for estimating behavioral response of insects to climate warming. J. Insect Physiol. 58:3303–9
    [Google Scholar]
  75. 75.
    Malmstrom CM, Bigelow P, Trębicki P, Busch AK, Friel C et al. 2017. Crop-associated virus reduces the rooting depth of non-crop perennial native grass more than non-crop-associated virus with known viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR). Virus Res 241:172–84
    [Google Scholar]
  76. 76.
    Malmstrom CM, Field CB. 1997. Virus-induced differences in the response of oat plants to elevated carbon dioxide. Plant Cell Environ 20:2178–88
    [Google Scholar]
  77. 77.
    Malmstrom CM, Hughes CC, Newton LA, Stoner CJ. 2005. Virus infection in remnant native bunchgrasses from invaded California grasslands. New Phytol 168:1217–30
    [Google Scholar]
  78. 78.
    Malmstrom CM, McCullough AJ, Johnson HA, Newton LA, Borer ET. 2005. Invasive annual grasses indirectly increase virus incidence in California native perennial bunchgrasses. Oecologia 145:1153–64
    [Google Scholar]
  79. 79.
    Malmstrom CM, Stoner CJ, Brandenburg S, Newton LA. 2006. Virus infection and grazing exert counteracting influences on survivorship of native bunchgrass seedlings competing with invasive exotics. J. Ecol. 94:2264–75
    [Google Scholar]
  80. 80.
    Marshall EJP. 2004. Agricultural landscapes: field margin habitats and their interaction with crop production. J. Crop Improv. 12:1–2365–404
    [Google Scholar]
  81. 81.
    Masson-Delmotte V, Zhai P, Pirani A, Connors SL, Péan C et al., eds. 2021. Climate change 2021: the physical science basis. Work. Group I Rep. IPCC Geneva, Switz: https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg1/downloads/report/IPCC_AR6_WGI_Full_Report.pdf
    [Google Scholar]
  82. 82.
    Mauck K, Bosque-Pérez NA, Eigenbrode SD, De Moraes CM, Mescher MC. 2012. Transmission mechanisms shape pathogen effects on host-vector interactions: evidence from plant viruses. Funct. Ecol. 26:51162–75
    [Google Scholar]
  83. 83.
    McElhany JP, Real LA, Power AG. 1995. Disease spread, spatial dynamics, and vector preference for diseased hosts: a study of barley yellow dwarf virus. Ecology 76:444–57
    [Google Scholar]
  84. 84.
    McNamara L, Gauthier K, Walsh L, Thébaud G, Gaffney M, Jacquot E. 2020. Management of yellow dwarf disease in Europe in a post-neonicotinoid agriculture. Pest Manag. Sci. 76:72276–85
    [Google Scholar]
  85. 85.
    Medina-Ortega KJ, Rez NAB-P, Ngumbi E, Nez-Martinez ESJ, Eigenbrode SD 2009. Rhopalosiphum padi (Hemiptera: Aphididae) responses to volatile cues from barley yellow dwarf virus-infected wheat. Environ. Entomol. 38:3836–45
    [Google Scholar]
  86. 86.
    Michaud JP 2010. Implications of climate change for cereal aphids on the Great Plains of North America. Aphid Biodiversity under Environmental Change P Kindlmann, AFG Dixon, JP Michaud 69–89 Dordrecht, Neth: Springer
    [Google Scholar]
  87. 87.
    Miller JW, Coon BF. 1964. The effect of barley yellow dwarf virus on the biology of its vector the English grain aphid, Macrosiphum granarium. J. Econ. Entomol. 57:6970–74
    [Google Scholar]
  88. 88.
    Miller WA, Rasochova L. 1997. Barley yellow dwarf viruses. Annu. Rev. Phytopathol. 35:167–90
    [Google Scholar]
  89. 89.
    Monneveux P, St-Pierre CA, Comeau A 1989. Barley yellow dwarf virus tolerance in drought situations. Barley Yellow Dwarf in West Asia and North Africa: Proceedings of a Workshop Organized by the ICARDA and IDRC held in Rabat, Morocco, 19–21 November A Comeau, KM Makkouk Beirut: ICARDA
    [Google Scholar]
  90. 90.
    Montllor CB, Gildow FE. 1986. Feeding responses of two grain aphids to barley yellow dwarf virus-infected oats. Entomol. Exp. Appl. 42:163–69
    [Google Scholar]
  91. 91.
    Mordecai EA, Hindenlang M, Mitchell CE. 2015. Differential impacts of virus diversity on biomass production of a native and an exotic grass host. PLOS ONE 10:7e0134355
    [Google Scholar]
  92. 92.
    Moreno-Delafuente A, Viñuela E, Fereres A, Medina P, Trębicki P. 2020. Simultaneous increase in CO2 and temperature alters wheat growth and aphid performance differently depending on virus infection. Insects 11:8459
    [Google Scholar]
  93. 93.
    Nancarrow N, Constable FE, Finlay KJ, Freeman AJ, Rodoni BC et al. 2014. The effect of elevated temperature on Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV in wheat. Virus Res 186:97–103
    [Google Scholar]
  94. 94.
    Newman J, Gibson D, Hickam E, Lorenz M, Adams E et al. 1999. Elevated carbon dioxide results in smaller populations of the bird cherry-oat aphid Rhopalosiphum padi. Ecol. Entomol. 24:486–89
    [Google Scholar]
  95. 95.
    Njue M, Muturi P, Nyaga J, Jonsson M. 2021. Influence of drought on interactions between Rhopalosiphum padi and ground dwelling predators: a mesocosm study. J. Appl. Entomol. 145:9934–38
    [Google Scholar]
  96. 96.
    Nottingham SF, Hardie J, Dawson GW, Hick AJ, Pickett JA et al. 1991. Behavioral and electrophysiological responses of aphids to host and nonhost plant volatiles. J. Chem. Ecol. 17:61231–42
    [Google Scholar]
  97. 97.
    Oswald JW, Houston BE. 1953. The yellow-dwarf virus disease of cereal crops. Phytopathology 43:3128–36
    [Google Scholar]
  98. 98.
    Pakdel A, Afsharifar A, Niazi A, Almasi R, Izadpanah K. 2010. Distribution of cereal luteoviruses and molecular diversity of BYDV-PAV isolates in central and southern Iran: proposal of a new species in the genus Luteovirus. J. Phytopathol. 158:5357–64
    [Google Scholar]
  99. 99.
    Parry HR, Macfadyen S, Kriticos DJ. 2012. The geographical distribution of yellow dwarf viruses and their aphid vectors in Australian grasslands and wheat. Australas. Plant Pathol. 41:4375–87
    [Google Scholar]
  100. 100.
    Perry KL, Kolb FL, Sammons B, Lawson C, Cisar G, Ohm H. 2000. Yield effects of barley yellow dwarf virus in soft red winter wheat. Phytopathology 90:91043–48
    [Google Scholar]
  101. 101.
    Plantegenest M, Le May C, Fabre F 2007. Landscape epidemiology of plant diseases. J. R. Soc. Interface 4:16963–72
    [Google Scholar]
  102. 102.
    Pons X, Tatchell GM. 1995. Drought stress and cereal aphid performance. Ann. Appl. Biol. 126:119–31
    [Google Scholar]
  103. 103.
    Porras MF, Navas CA, Marden JH, Mescher MC, De Moraes CM et al. 2020. Enhanced heat tolerance of viral-infected aphids leads to niche expansion and reduced interspecific competition. Nat Commun 11:11184
    [Google Scholar]
  104. 104.
    Power A, Gray S 1995. Aphid transmission of barley yellow dwarf viruses: interactions between viruses, vectors, and host plants. Barley Yellow Dwarf: 40 Years of Progress CJ D'Arcy, PA Burnett 259–89 St. Paul, MN: APS Press
    [Google Scholar]
  105. 105.
    Power AG. 1991. Virus spread and vector dynamics in genetically diverse plant populations. Ecology 72:1232–41
    [Google Scholar]
  106. 106.
    Power AG. 1996. Competition between viruses in a complex plant-pathogen system. Ecology 77:41004–10
    [Google Scholar]
  107. 107.
    Power AG, Borer ET, Hosseini P, Mitchell CE, Seabloom EW. 2011. The community ecology of barley/cereal yellow dwarf viruses in Western US grasslands. Virus Res 159:295–100
    [Google Scholar]
  108. 108.
    Power AG, Mitchell CE. 2004. Pathogen spillover in disease epidemics. Am. Nat. 164:S5S79–S89
    [Google Scholar]
  109. 109.
    Purse BV, Mellor PS, Rogers DJ, Samuel AR, Mertens PPC, Baylis M. 2005. Climate change and the recent emergence of bluetongue in Europe. Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 3:2171–81
    [Google Scholar]
  110. 110.
    Quiroz C, Lister RM, Araya JE, Foster JE. 1991. Effect of symptom variants derived from the NY-MAV isolate of barley yellow dwarf virus on the life cycle of the English grain aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae) and on yield components in wheat and oats. J. Econ. Entomol. 84:61920–25
    [Google Scholar]
  111. 111.
    Restaino CM, Peterson DL, Littell J. 2016. Increased water deficit decreases Douglas fir growth throughout western US forests. PNAS 113:349557–62
    [Google Scholar]
  112. 112.
    Rochow WF. 1970. Barley yellow dwarf virus: phenotypic mixing and vector specificity. Science 167:3919875–78
    [Google Scholar]
  113. 113.
    Roosien BK, Gomulkiewicz R, Ingwell LL, Bosque-Pérez NA, Rajabaskar D, Eigenbrode SD. 2013. Conditional vector preference aids the spread of plant pathogens: results from a model. Environ. Entomol. 42:61299–1308
    [Google Scholar]
  114. 114.
    Rúa MA, McCulley RL, Mitchell CE. 2013. Fungal endophyte infection and host genetic background jointly modulate host response to an aphid transmitted viral pathogen. J. Ecol. 101:41007–18
    [Google Scholar]
  115. 115.
    Salas ML, Corcuera LJ. 1991. Effect of environment on gramine content in barley leaves and susceptibility to the aphid Schizaphis graminum. Phytochemistry 30:103237–40
    [Google Scholar]
  116. 116.
    Saulescu NN, Ittu G, Ciuca M, Ittu M, Serban G, Mustatea P. 2011. Transferring useful rye genes to wheat, using triticale as a bridge. Czech J. Genet. Plant Breed. 47:Spec. IssueS56–S62
    [Google Scholar]
  117. 117.
    Schrotenboer AC, Allen MS, Malmstrom CM. 2011. Modification of native grasses for biofuel production may increase virus susceptibility. GCB Bioenergy 3:5360–74
    [Google Scholar]
  118. 118.
    Seabloom EW, Borer ET, Gross K, Kendig AE, Lacroix C et al. 2015. The community ecology of pathogens: coinfection, coexistence and community composition. Ecol. Lett. 18:4401–15
    [Google Scholar]
  119. 119.
    Seabloom EW, Borer ET, Mitchell CE, Power AG. 2010. Viral diversity and prevalence gradients in North American Pacific Coast grasslands. Ecology 91:3721–32
    [Google Scholar]
  120. 120.
    Seabloom EW, Harpole WS, Reichman OJ, Tilman D. 2003. Invasion, competitive dominance, and resource use by exotic and native California grassland species. PNAS 100:2313384–89
    [Google Scholar]
  121. 121.
    Seabloom EW, Hosseini PR, Power AG, Borer ET. 2009. Diversity and composition of viral communities: coinfection of barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses in California grasslands. Am. Nat. 173:3E79–E98
    [Google Scholar]
  122. 122.
    Shah SJA, Bashir M, Manzoor N 2012. A review on barley yellow dwarf virus. Crop Production for Agricultural Improvement M Ashraf, M Öztürk, MSA Ahmad, A Aksoy 747–82 Dordrecht, Neth: Springer
    [Google Scholar]
  123. 123.
    Shaw AK, Igoe M, Power AG, Bosque-Pérez NA, Peace A. 2019. Modeling approach influences dynamics of a vector-borne pathogen system. Bull. Math. Biol. 81:62011–28
    [Google Scholar]
  124. 124.
    Shaw AK, Peace A, Power AG, Bosque-Pérez NA. 2017. Vector population growth and condition-dependent movement drive the spread of plant pathogens. Ecology 98:813
    [Google Scholar]
  125. 125.
    Shoemaker LG, Hayhurst E, Weiss-Lehman CP, Strauss AT, Porath-Krause A et al. 2019. Pathogens manipulate the preference of vectors, slowing disease spread in a multi-host system. Ecol. Lett. 22:71115–25
    [Google Scholar]
  126. 126.
    Sisterson MS. 2008. Effects of insect-vector preference for healthy or infected plants on pathogen spread: insights from a model. J. Econ. Entomol. 101:11–8
    [Google Scholar]
  127. 127.
    Smith HC. 1963. Control of barley yellow dwarf virus in cereals. N.Z. J. Agric. Res. 6:3–4229–44
    [Google Scholar]
  128. 128.
    Smyrnioudis IN, Harrington R, Katis N, Clark SJ. 2000. The effect of drought stress and temperature on spread of barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV). Agric. For. Entomol. 2:3161–66
    [Google Scholar]
  129. 129.
    Sõmera M, Fargette D, Hébrard E, Sarmiento C, Rep. Consort ICTV 2021. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Solemoviridae 2021. J. Gen. Virol. 102:12001707
    [Google Scholar]
  130. 130.
    Svanella-Dumas L, Candresse T, Hullé M, Marais A. 2013. Distribution of Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV in the sub-Antarctic Kerguelen Islands and characterization of two new Luteovirus species. PLOS ONE 8:6e67231
    [Google Scholar]
  131. 131.
    Syller J. 2012. Facilitative and antagonistic interactions between plant viruses in mixed infections. Mol. Plant Pathol. 13:2204–16
    [Google Scholar]
  132. 132.
    Szittya G, Silhavy D, Molnár A, Havelda Z, Lovas A et al. 2003. Low temperature inhibits RNA silencing-mediated defence by the control of siRNA generation. EMBO J 22:3633–40
    [Google Scholar]
  133. 133.
    Thresh JM. 1974. Temporal patterns of virus spread. Annu. Rev. Phytopathol. 12:111–28
    [Google Scholar]
  134. 134.
    Trębicki P, Nancarrow N, Bosque-Pérez NA, Rodoni B, Aftab M et al. 2017. Virus incidence in wheat increases under elevated CO2: a 4-year study of yellow dwarf viruses from a free air carbon dioxide facility. Virus Res 241:137–44
    [Google Scholar]
  135. 135.
    Trębicki P, Nancarrow N, Cole E, Bosque-Pérez NA, Constable FE et al. 2015. Virus disease in wheat predicted to increase with a changing climate. Glob. Change Biol. 21:93511–19
    [Google Scholar]
  136. 136.
    Trębicki P, Vandegeer RK, Bosque-Pérez NA, Powell KS, Dader B et al. 2016. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors. Sci. Rep. 6:122785
    [Google Scholar]
  137. 137.
    van der Broek LJ. 1980. The median latent periods for three isolates of barley yellow dwarf virus in aphid vectors. Phytopathology 70:7644–46
    [Google Scholar]
  138. 138.
    Vandegeer R, Powell K, Tausz M. 2015. Host symptom expression and antioxidant defence systems of wheat infected with barley yellow dwarf virus and grown under elevated CO2. Procedia Environ. Sci. 29:177–78
    [Google Scholar]
  139. 139.
    Vandegeer R, Powell KS, Tausz M. 2016. Barley yellow dwarf virus infection and elevated CO2 alter the antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione in wheat. J. Plant Physiol. 199:96–99
    [Google Scholar]
  140. 140.
    Wade RN, Karley AJ, Johnson SN, Hartley SE. 2017. Impact of predicted precipitation scenarios on multitrophic interactions. Funct. Ecol. 31:81647–58
    [Google Scholar]
  141. 141.
    Walls J, Rajotte E, Rosa C. 2019. The past, present, and future of barley yellow dwarf management. Agriculture 9:123
    [Google Scholar]
  142. 142.
    Yamamura K, Kiritani K. 1998. A simple method to estimate the potential increase in the number of generations under global warming in temperate zones. Appl. Entomol. Zool. 33:2289–98
    [Google Scholar]
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-phyto-020620-101848
Loading
/content/journals/10.1146/annurev-phyto-020620-101848
Loading

Data & Media loading...

Supplementary Data

  • Article Type: Review Article
This is a required field
Please enter a valid email address
Approval was a Success
Invalid data
An Error Occurred
Approval was partially successful, following selected items could not be processed due to error