1932

Abstract

Biotechnological advances now permit broad exploration of past microbial communities preserved in diverse substrates. Despite biomolecular degradation, high-throughput sequencing of preserved materials can yield invaluable genomic and metagenomic data from the past. This line of research has expanded from its initial human- and animal-centric foci to include plant-associated microbes (viruses, archaea, bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes), for which historical, archaeological, and paleontological data illuminate past epidemics and evolutionary history. Genetic mechanisms underlying the acquisition of microbial pathogenicity, including hybridization, polyploidization, and horizontal gene transfer, can now be reconstructed, as can gene-for-gene coevolution with plant hosts. Epidemiological parameters, such as geographic origin and range expansion, can also be assessed. Building on published case studies with individual phytomicrobial taxa, the stage is now set for broader, community-wide studies of preserved plant microbiomes to strengthen mechanistic understanding of microbial interactions and plant disease emergence.

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2022-08-26
2024-06-18
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