1932

Abstract

is an evolutionarily diverse bacterial species complex and a preeminent model for the study of plant–pathogen interactions due in part to its remarkably broad host range. A critical feature of virulence is the employment of suites of type III secreted effector (T3SE) proteins, which vary widely in composition and function. These effectors act on a variety of plant intracellular targets to promote pathogenesis but can also be avirulence factors when detected by host immune complexes. In this review, we survey the phylogenetic diversity (PD) of the effectorome, comprising 70 distinct T3SE families identified to date, and highlight how avoidance of host immune detection has shaped effectorome diversity through functional redundancy, diversification, and horizontal transfer. We present emerging avenues for research and novel insights that can be gained via future investigations of plant–pathogen interactions through the fusion of large-scale interaction screens and phylogenomic approaches.

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2022-08-26
2024-06-13
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