1932

Abstract

The group of strains constituting the species complex (RSSC) is a prominent model for the study of plant-pathogenic bacteria because of its impact on agriculture, owing to its wide host range, worldwide distribution, and long persistence in the environment. RSSC strains have led to numerous studies aimed at deciphering the molecular bases of virulence, and many biological functions and mechanisms have been described to contribute to host infection and pathogenesis. In this review, we put into perspective recent advances in our understanding of virulence in RSSC strains, both in terms of the inventory of functions that participate in this process and their evolutionary dynamics. We also present the different strategies that have been developed to combat these pathogenic strains through biological control, antimicrobial agents, plant genetics, or microbiota engineering.

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2023-09-05
2024-04-14
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