1932

Abstract

Among plant-associated bacteria, agrobacteria occupy a special place. These bacteria are feared in the field as agricultural pathogens. They cause abnormal growth deformations and significant economic damage to a broad range of plant species. However, these bacteria are revered in the laboratory as models and tools. They are studied to discover and understand basic biological phenomena and used in fundamental plant research and biotechnology. Agrobacterial pathogenicity and capability for transformation are one and the same and rely on functions encoded largely on their oncogenic plasmids. Here, we synthesize a substantial body of elegant work that elucidated agrobacterial virulence mechanisms and described their ecology. We review findings in the context of the natural diversity that has been recently unveiled for agrobacteria and emphasize their genomics and plasmids. We also identify areas of research that can capitalize on recent findings to further transform our understanding of agrobacterial virulence and ecology.

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2023-09-05
2024-06-21
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