1932

Abstract

The loss of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant and minimal advances in the development and registration of new chemical fumigants has resulted in a resurgence of interest in the application of organic amendments (OAs) for soilborne plant pathogen and plant-parasitic nematode management. Significant progress has been made in the characterization of OAs, application of strategies for their use, and elucidation of mechanisms by which they suppress soilborne pests. Nonetheless, their utility is limited by the variability of disease control, expense, and the logistics of introducing them into crop production systems. Recent advances in molecular techniques have led to significant progress in the elucidation of the role of bacteria and fungi and their metabolic products on disease suppression with the addition of OAs. Biosolarization and anaerobic soil disinfestation, developed to manipulate systems and favor beneficial microorganisms to maximize their impact on plant pathogens, are built on a strong historical research foundation in OAs and the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of disease-suppressive soils. This review focuses on recent applications of OAs and their potential for the management of soilborne plant pathogens and plant-parasitic nematodes, with emphasis primarily on annual fruit and vegetable production systems.

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2020-08-25
2024-06-22
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